Friday, October 31, 2008

Artist Spotlight: Louise Cady-Fernandes of The Hole Thing

For quite some time I have been interviewing artists who live and work green for The Organic Mechanic. Louise Cady-Fernandes of The Hole Thing in Lexington, Massachusetts was pleased to share some information with me and I felt that now with both blogs it would be fantastic to give her double the exposure so this interview will be posted on both blogs today.





Can you tell us a little about what it is you do?

I create a line of whimsical felted wool sweaters, housewares, and accessories, that are made from recycled sweaters. Many of my sweaters have die-cut holes in them which create windows for whatever is worn underneath. The circles that come out of all the holes are recycled again onto other products.


How long have you been creating felted items such as clothes, housewares and accessories?

I came up with the design concept in November of 2005 while I was at Susan Bristol Inc. I worked there in knitwear design for 16 years. I made a felted "hole" sweater for myself never intending for it to turn into a business, but the idea quickly caught on. THE HOLE THING hit the market in September of 2006.



What is the creative process behind your work? How does an idea take shape?

THE HOLE THING grew out of my love for both polka dots and felted wool. For years creating a sweater with holes had been on my list of things to make for myself. I didn't want to knit it though as that seemed too monotonous. Then one day, while I was making a blanket out of old sweaters that I had felted and cut into squares, it came to me to make my hole sweater out of an old felted sweater. The creative process for my line is continually evolving and expanding which I love. Now I have 18 products that include among other things, scarves & hats, candle holders & vases, note cards, and a felted jewelry line that incorporates the leftover holes that are punched out of all the sweaters.

Where do you acquire the wool used in your designs?

I shop at thrift stores, but I also get lots of hand me downs from friends and family. My 86 year Mom also gathers old sweaters for me occasionally. I usually buy between 30-50 sweaters at once.

Why recycled/upcycled wool?

Why not? There is so much of it out there. Anytime we can use what is already available a new product doesn't need to be produced. This is terrific because virgin resources aren't being used for production. New products take precious energy to create, and often have hazardous environmental waste such as dyes and other pollutants. New products also consume lots of energy because they need to be packaged and shipped long distances.



How do you feel that using upcycled, and natural, wool helps the environment?

see above.

When did you first become interested in living and working in a green way by repurposing?

Both of my parents grew up in the depression and living a more minimalist life kind of seeped into me like osmosis! My dad was forever running around turning off lights, my mom cleaned out jars of mayonnaise etc with a spatula to "get every little bit". For me being green isn't a sacrifice or a challenge, it is something that brings me pleasure. I am forever thinking about how I can do things more thoughtfully. The beauty of THE HOLE THING initially for me was as much about the design as it was about having a business that upcycled.

Has any one green practice become second nature, something you personally do every day?

I would have to say that my greenest practice is being conscious about what I do- I am always wondering how I can do something in a more environmentally mindful way. For me it's just about paying closer attention.



What green practice do you recommend readers try?

Gosh there are so many! How about this- try getting organized enough so that you only have to grocery shop once a week. I know this sounds horrendous but it honestly only takes a few minutes of planning each week. Shopping once a week not only saves on repeat, gas guzzling trips to the grocery shore, but it also saves on trips to get take-out food and all the wasteful packaging it creates. My website has lots of other great green tips.

As an independent artist what is your greatest challenge?

All the different hats that need to be worn. My favorite thing is to design. Luckily though, I think I am about equally right, and left, brained so at least the book keeping and other logistical tasks are a little more satisying for me than for most artists. For instance I like to balance my checkbook and I know that this is a rare thing for most everyone.

Do you remember the feeling of your first sale? Has that feeling changed now that you have sold many more items?

I do remember the excitement of my first sale. I think I like doing craft shows because although the excitement has diminished, the feeling gets created over and over again. I love to see the happiness that my whimsical designs provide people. It makes me happy.

What is your advice to a fellow artisan who is new to their industry?

Figure out how much you want to make per hour for your work. Then keep track of how much time it takes to create what you make and how much your supplies cost etc. This has been very helpful to me because I know immediately which of my products are cost effective and which aren't. My other advice in business is to plan on making mistakes. They will teach you and will act as arrows pointing you in which direction to go in next.



Do you have online presences where readers can learn more about you?

Yes -- The Hole Thing
(Editor’s Note: Louise also has an Online Shop on Etsy)
Is your work featured in a boutique or other brick & mortar location?

I am in nine stores. The newest one is a wonderful new store called Bead and Fiber in Boston's south end on Harrison Avenue.

Because of Louise’s efforts in utilizing upcycling, natural fibers and her constant environmental eye in everything she does I am granting her a solid Four green Leaves!


4 comments:

Bridgete said...

People grocery shop more than once a week? I don't even understand how that would happen.

Love the sweaters, by the way...but I'm very focused on this grocery shopping thing. I feel slightly naive now...

Jenn said...

Yup, I have actually seen this first hand. Here in Boston I worked with a couple who shopped each night after work for their dinner that night. In NY it was common to do the same (ooh I think we should have pork chops for dinner, I'll pop in to the butcher on the way home...)

Personally I can not go grocery shopping more than once every 2-3 weeks. We buy lots of stuff that can be frozen in containers and thawed for dinner the night before we will eat it. Fruit will last up to a week, some fresh veggies even longer and milk we purchase as needed (for coffee and stuff).

Bridgete said...

Wow. I have never seen that.

I go roughly every 2 weeks, unless I have an impulse to make something and I need ingredients that I don't just pick up on a normal grocery store run. But even when I do that I check and see what else I should grab at the store as long as I'm already going.

Victoria said...

Inspirational! Thank you for introducing me to Louise! Her work is awesome- love the hole sweater- totally unique :)